Historic Tour of Huntsville

Details

Huntsville has a long and fascinating history beginning with the native Bedias peoples and the original Mexican League and Labor Grant (4,428 acres plus 177 acres) to Pleasant Gray, from Huntsville, Alabama. Early settlers farmed cotton in the open meadows and the massive bales of cotton were taken by wagon to the river settlements at Cleveland, Riverside or Trinity. The first prison was built here just before the Civil War and housed some of the Union prisoners while supplying cotton uniforms and blankets to the Confederacy. The State Normal Institute opened in 1879 to provide teachers for the growing Texas population.  

The 10 years of Reconstruction gave African Americans a chance to build up a strong and active community. Fearing those raucous traveling salesmen, and refusing to pay the $100,000 requested by the railroad, Huntsville chose not to invite the railroad to establish a depot. The Railroad was built 8 miles east at Phelps. The only remnant is the famous Tilly’s Tapp built in 1873 at a cost of $300,000. By the 1880s, prisoners provided a work force for cotton plantations. Timber became a profitable business during the turn-of-the-century followed by agricultural products after the World Wars. Oil brought great prosperity to Houston and, by extension, to Huntsville. The artistic community expanded with the creations of David Adickes, with his statue of Sam Houston, and Dan Philips who focused on affordable housing from recycled goods.  

Itinerary

HISTORIC TOUR OF HUNTSVILLE

Limousine Party bus               Coffee/water/snacks     Time: 9am–2 pm                 Price $90        

Itinerary:

9 am – Board the Joye Mobile at 1212 12tStreet or a location of your choice.

 

Founders Park – Begin with the native Bedias people and Huntsville’s fresh water springs.

Huntsville Town Square – Pleasant Gray came from Huntsville Alabama in 1835. Original Mexican League and Labor Grant (4,428 acres plus 177 acres), Gibbs Brothers Mercantile.

Sam Houston Museum – Drive through the grounds of the Museum, Learn about log cabins and early settlers Sam Houston and Henderson Yoakum.

Cotton plantations- Early settlers farmed cotton in the open meadows and the massive bales of cotton were taken by wagon to the river settlements at Cleveland or Riverside or Trinity.

Avenue M, University Avenue to SHSU, past Austin Hall and Sam Houston Normal Institute. Huntsville as a cultural center, Capital of Texas, 7 Hills and the Men's and Lady's Academies.

The Walls Unit- built in 1845 just before the Civil War. During the war it housed some Union prisoners while supplying cotton uniforms and blankets to the Confederacy. Also famous in later years for Kiowa Chief Satanta, Bonnie and Clyde, Old Sparky and the Carrasco Killings.

Oakwood Cemetery and grave sites of many famous Huntsvillians including Sam Houston, Henderson Yoakum, the Black Jesus, and Joshua Houston's grave site,

1treet and Avenue M (The Drag). Reconstruction gave African Americans a chanceto build up a strong and active community. Led by Joshua Houston and otherleaders, the Black community established schools and were elected togovernmental positions in Huntsville until the 1880s when the rise of the KKKforced many to leave for Houston.  

University Avenue – During 1870s, Huntsville chose not to invite the railroad to establish a depot, and was left with the small Tilly’s Tapp which brought students from Dallas and Houston. Cotton continued to be carried by wagon to the Trinity River or the railheads along the river.  

Back to the Town Square and down 11 Street to Avenue O. By the 1880s, thegrowth of the prison system across the state provided a work force for cottonplantations. Gibbs Powell Museum, Wynne Home, The Whistler. With wealth from cotton,the Thomasons, the Easthams (pronounced Eessom), the Gibbs, the Smithers andmany others built brick buildings on the town square and beautiful homes along1 Street and Ave. O.  

Turn of the Century - Town Square, Texan Café, Eastham Building to Sam Houston Avenue and Boettcher’s Mill. In addition to oil discoveries along the coast (none in Walker County), timber became a profitable business during the turn-of-the-century leading to clear-cutting trees and great wealth for people from Trinity, New Waverly and Huntsville.

Back to Sam Houston Ave to Pritchett Field– the Great Depression brought the Civilian Conservation Corp and the Works Progress Administration to plant more trees, build sidewalks, a football field and the beautiful State Park.

University Avenue to 11 Street - After the World Wars, oil brought greatprosperity to Houston and, by extension, to Huntsville. The Universitycontinued to grow and professors built beautiful homes along University Avenue,as well as moving out to subdivisions such as Forest Glen, Westridge,Timberwild, and lkins Lake Subdivision.

11th Street - The artistic community expanded with the creations of David Adickes, with his statue of Sam Houston, and heads of Presidents which are currently in Houston. His art work is on display at his old Huntsville High school, today the Nature Center.  

Dan Phillips of the Phoenix Commotion focused on affordable housing from recycled goods. Check out the Ted Talks on his website which show the interiors of his homes. Phillips is most famous for the Hat House and Boot House although our art tours include some of the many other homes created by Dan Phillips.

12:30 ish – Stop for lunch at John Matthews 1836 Restaurant, historic Mr. Hamburger, or The Farmhouse, your choice. After lunch, we will have a final stop at the David Adickes Sam Houston Statue for your very own selfies with 60+ft Big Sam.

Sanitized And Safe

For your safety, the bus is fully sanitized and disinfected before each tour. Masks are available for your use.

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Tour bus van

tour Bus Included!

For your special occasions - 12 passenger, limo seating, party van with a dance pole! Cooler with cold water.

90

Per Ticket

Tour Start Date

Tour End Date

Call For Reservations

936-355-5468

Tour Type

One Day Tours

How Many Days

1 Days

Tour Location

Huntsville

Bus Seating

8 - 12 People Total

Seats Available

12

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